Author’s Forum Presents:Rednecks, Queers, and Country Music: A Conversation with Nadine Hubbs and Paul A. Anderson

November 11, 2014

Author’s Forum Presents:Rednecks, Queers, and Country Music: A Conversation with Nadine Hubbs and Paul A. Anderson

In her provocative new book Rednecks, Queers, and Country Music, Nadine Hubbs looks at how class and gender identity play out in one of America’s most culturally and politically charged forms of popular music. Skillfully weaving historical inquiry with an examination of classed cultural repertoires and close listening to country songs, Hubbs confronts the shifting and deeply entangled workings of taste, sexuality, and class politics. – University of California Press

Nadine Hubbs is professor of women’s studies and music and faculty associate of the Department of American Culture, and director of the U-M Lesbian-Gay-Queer Research Initiative (LGQRI). A musicologist, gender and sexuality scholar, and cultural historian, her work focuses on Anglo-American popular and classical music, gender and queer studies, modern U.S. culture, and class studies. Her award-winning first book is titled The Queer Composition of America’s Sound: Gay Modernists, American Music, and National Identity.

Paul A. Anderson is associate professor of American culture and Afroamerican and African studies at the University of Michigan. His fields of study include 20th-century U.S. intellectual and cultural history; African-American cultural history; jazz and popular music studies; Harlem Renaissance; modernism; and critical theory.

Start: November 11, 2014 5:30 pm
End: November 11, 2014 7:00 pm
Venue: Hatcher Graduate Library
Address:
913 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, United States

November 18, 2014

Author’s Forum Presents: The Betrayers A Conversation with David Bezmozgis and Jeremiah Chamberlin

About The Betrayers: These incandescent pages give us one fraught, momentous day in the life of Baruch Kotler, a Soviet Jewish dissident who now finds himself a disgraced Israeli politician. When he refuses to back down from a contrary but principled stand regarding the settlements in the West Bank, his political opponents expose his affair with a mistress decades his junior, and the besieged couple escapes to Yalta, the faded Crimean resort of Kotler’s youth. There, shockingly, Kotler comes face-to-face with the former friend whose denunciation sent him to the Gulag almost forty years earlier. - Hachette Book Group

David Bezmozgis is an award-winning writer and filmmaker. His stories have appeared in numerous publications including The New Yorker,HarpersZoetrope All-Story, and The Walrus. His first book, Natasha and Other Stories, was published in 2004 in the US and Canada and was subsequently translated into fifteen languages. Natasha was a New York Times Notable Book, one of the New York Public Library’s 25 Books to Remember for 2004, and an Amazon.com Top 10 Book for 2004. 

Start: November 18, 2014 5:00 pm
End: November 18, 2014 6:00 pm
Venue: Hatcher Graduate Library
Address:
913 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, United States

November 19, 2014

Author’s Forum Presents:Detroit Chene Street History Project: A Conversation with Marian Krzyzowski, Deborah Dash Moore, and Karen Majewski

Since 2002, the Institute for Research on Labor, Employment and the Economy at the University of Michigan has been conducting a study of Detroit’s Chene Street, which cuts through the east side of Detroit from the Detroit River to the General Motors Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly plant at the Hamtramck border. Chene Street was once one of the city’s most vibrant commercial corridors. Home to hundreds of small and medium-sized businesses, many of them run by immigrant families, this thoroughfare was the main artery for the neighborhoods that radiated along its length, as well as their link with each other. It stood at the heart of family, work, and social life for tens of thousands who arrived in Detroit from all over the world, as well as for African Americans migrating from the south. Many of them came to fill the 100,000 automotive industry jobs within walking distance of its neighborhoods. Today, virtually no signs of those neighborhoods remain. Chene Street and its surrounding blocks are among the most devastated and depopulated in the city.

The Detroit Chene Street History Project is developing a comprehensive social and commercial history of the neighborhood that conveys what it felt like to live and work there during the twentieth-century. To date, the project team has accumulated several hundred oral histories from Polish, Jewish, and African American residents and business owners; scanned thousands of photographs and other documents, including ethnic newspapers, church bulletins, organizational records, personal papers, and other ephemera; and tracked individual real estate parcels to provide the foundation for a revealing and richly detailed portrait of Chene Street and its arterial residential and mixed use neighborhoods from 1890 to 1990.

Marian Krzyzowski is the director of the Institute for Research on Labor, Employment and the Economy at the University of Michigan.

Karen Majewsky is the mayor of Hamtramck and is a project manager at University of Michigan’s Institute for Research on Labor, Employment and the Economy.

Deborah Dash Moore is the director of the Frankel Center for Judaic Studies and a Frederick G.L. Huetwell Professor of History at the University of Michigan.

Start: November 19, 2014 5:30 pm
End: November 19, 2014 7:00 pm
Venue: Hatcher Graduate Library
Address:
913 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, United States

December 1, 2014

Author’s Forum Presents:If a Stranger Approaches You: A Conversation with Laura Kasischke and Megan Levad

In her first collection of short stories, Laura Kasischke exposes the dark heart of the domestic—it’s wrapped in shabby silk, tucked away in a dresser drawer. If A Stranger Approaches You reminds us that intersection of the bizarre and the quotidian is always at play. Memorial statues and raggedy dolls seem to come to life, a man listens to the electric menace of suburban power lines while he struggles with his failed marriage, and the little boy and his dog knocking on the door might be Death in disguise. Surreal and darkly comic, these are stories that know the unexpected graces and random collisions that drive and haunt us. As one of her narrators remarks, “What a thing, this life.” – Amazon.com

Laura Kasischke is Allan Seager Colleagiate Professor of English Language & Literature at the University of Michigan. Recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry, 2012, she has published nine novels, three of which have been made into feature films—The Life Before Her EyesSuspicious RiverWhite Bird in a Blizzard—and eight books of poetry.

Megan Levad is the assistant director of the Helen Zell Writers’ Program at the University of Michigan. Her poems have appeared in American Letters & CommentaryAnOtherDenver Quarterly, among other publications and anthologies. She also writes lyrics for composers Tucker Fuller and Kristin Kuster. 

Start: December 1, 2014 5:30 pm
End: December 1, 2014 7:00 pm
Venue: Hatcher Graduate Library
Address:
913 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, United States
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