Author’s Forum Presents: Deviations: A Gayle Rubin Reader: A Conversation with Gayle Rubin and Valerie Traub

October 27, 2014

Author’s Forum Presents: Deviations: A Gayle Rubin Reader: A Conversation with Gayle Rubin and Valerie Traub

Deviations is the definitive collection of writing by Gayle S. Rubin, a pioneering theorist and activist in feminist, lesbian and gay, queer, and sexuality studies since the 1970s. Rubin first rose to prominence in 1975 with the publication of “The Traffic in Women,” an essay that had a galvanizing effect on feminist thinking and theory. In another landmark piece, “Thinking Sex,” she examined how certain sexual behaviors are constructed as moral or natural, and others as unnatural. That essay became one of queer theory’s foundational texts. Along with such canonical work, Deviations features less well-known but equally insightful writing on subjects such as lesbian history, the feminist sex wars, the politics of sadomasochism, crusades against prostitution and pornography, and the historical development of sexual knowledge. In the introduction, Rubin traces her intellectual trajectory and discusses the development and reception of some of her most influential essays. Like the book it opens, the introduction highlights the major lines of inquiry pursued for nearly forty years by a singularly important theorist of sex, gender, and culture.

The Author’s Forum is a collaboration between the U-M Institute for the Humanities, University Library, Great Lakes Literary Arts Center, & Ann Arbor Book Festival.

 

Start: October 27, 2014 5:30 pm
End: October 27, 2014 7:00 pm
Venue: Hatcher Graduate Library
Address:
913 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, United States

November 11, 2014

Author’s Forum Presents:Rednecks, Queers, and Country Music: A Conversation with Nadine Hubbs and Paul A. Anderson

In her provocative new book Rednecks, Queers, and Country Music, Nadine Hubbs looks at how class and gender identity play out in one of America’s most culturally and politically charged forms of popular music. Skillfully weaving historical inquiry with an examination of classed cultural repertoires and close listening to country songs, Hubbs confronts the shifting and deeply entangled workings of taste, sexuality, and class politics.

In Hubbs’s view, the popular phrase “I’ll listen to anything but country” allows middle-class Americans to declare inclusive “omnivore” musical tastes with one crucial exclusion: country, a music linked to low-status whites. Throughout Rednecks, Queers, and Country Music, Hubbs dissects this gesture, examining how provincial white working people have emerged since the 1970s as the face of American bigotry, particularly homophobia, with country music their audible emblem. Bringing together the redneck and the queer, Hubbs challenges the conventional wisdom and historical amnesia that frame white working folk as a perpetual bigot class.

With a powerful combination of music criticism, cultural critique, and sociological analysis of contemporary class formation, Nadine Hubbs zeroes in on flawed assumptions about how country music models and mirrors white working-class identities. She particularly shows how dismissive, politically loaded middle-class discourses devalue country’s manifestations of working-class culture, politics, and values, and render working-class acceptance of queerness invisible.

Lucid, important, and thought-provoking, this book is essential reading for students and scholars of American music, gender and sexuality, class, and pop culture.

The Author’s Forum is a collaboration between the U-M Institute for the Humanities, University Library, Great Lakes Literary Arts Center, & Ann Arbor Book Festival.

Start: November 11, 2014 5:30 pm
End: November 11, 2014 7:00 pm
Venue: Hatcher Graduate Library
Address:
913 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, United States

November 19, 2014

Author’s Forum Presents:Detroit Chene Street History Project: A Conversation with Marian Krzyzowski, Deborah Dash Moore, and Karen Majewski

Since 2002, the Institute for Research on Labor, Employment and the Economy at the University of Michigan has been conducting a study of Detroit’s Chene Street, which cuts through the east side of Detroit from the Detroit River to the General Motors Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly plant at the Hamtramck border. Chene Street was once one of the city’s most vibrant commercial corridors. Home to hundreds of small and medium-sized businesses, many of them run by immigrant families, this thoroughfare was the main artery for the neighborhoods that radiated along its length, as well as their link with each other. It stood at the heart of family, work, and social life for tens of thousands who arrived in Detroit from all over the world, as well as for African Americans migrating from the south. Many of them came to fill the 100,000 automotive industry jobs within walking distance of its neighborhoods. Today, virtually no signs of those neighborhoods remain. Chene Street and its surrounding blocks are among the most devastated and depopulated in the city.

The Detroit Chene Street History Project is developing a comprehensive social and commercial history of the neighborhood that conveys what it felt like to live and work there during the twentieth-century. To date, the project team has accumulated several hundred oral histories from Polish, Jewish, and African American residents and business owners; scanned thousands of photographs and other documents, including ethnic newspapers, church bulletins, organizational records, personal papers, and other ephemera; and tracked individual real estate parcels to provide the foundation for a revealing and richly detailed portrait of Chene Street and its arterial residential and mixed use neighborhoods from 1890 to 1990.

The Author’s Forum is a collaboration between the U-M Institute for the Humanities, University Library, Great Lakes Literary Arts Center, & Ann Arbor Book Festival.

 

 

Start: November 19, 2014 5:30 pm
End: November 19, 2014 7:00 pm
Venue: Hatcher Graduate Library
Address:
913 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, United States

December 1, 2014

Author’s Forum Presents:If a Stranger Approaches You: A Conversation with Laura Kasischke and Megan Levan

Laura Kasischke and Megan Levad

 

Start: December 1, 2014 5:30 pm
End: December 1, 2014 7:00 pm
Venue: Hatcher Graduate Library
Address:
913 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, United States
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