Author’s Forum Presents: Coming Out Swiss: In Search of Heidi, Chocolate and my Other Self: A Conversation with Anne Herrmann and Helmut Puff

Anne Herrmann is professor of English and women’s studies. She received her degree in Comparative Literature, with an emphasis in English and German literature and French feminist theory. Her primary interests lie in 20th-century literary and cultural productions. A particular focus has been questions of subjectivity as related to the performance of identities and issues of literary genre and language. She is currently working on a book on Switzerland, a work of creative non-fiction that engages with questions of citizenship, cultural production and belonging, and the politics of language within a changing Europe.

 

Helmut Puff’s teaching and research focus on German literature, history, and culture in the late medieval and early modern period. He specializes in gender studies, the history of sexuality, media history, the history of reading, and the literature of the Reformation and the Renaissance. Recently, Helmut Puff has moved on to research modes of seeing and visual culture in early modern Europe with a focus on German Renaissance art, especially Albrecht Dürer. His interest in the intersections between textuality, visuality, and spatiality, has led him to research the changing representations of ruins as well as the history of three-dimensional city models from the sixteenth century to the present.

 

The Author’s Forum is a collaboration between the U-M Institute for the Humanities, University Library, Great Lakes Literary Arts Center, & Ann Arbor Book Festival.

Author’s Forum Presents: Dear Edward: Family Footprints: A Conversation with Paul Weinberg & Daniel Herwitz

A personal journey into the family archives of a talented photographer, this book explores Paul Weinberg’s past as he retraces his family’s footprints to far-flung small towns in the interior of South Africa—where his ancestors found a niche in the hotel trade. Part visual narrative and part multilayered travel book, this record is organized in the form of postcards to Weinberg’s great grandfather, Edward. Weaving history, historiography, and memoir into a personal pilgrimage, it sets up a dialogue between the past and present and questions who records history and who is left out of it. The family’s hotels are also revisited within these pages, and their evolution explored.

 

The Author’s Forum is a collaboration between the U-M Institute for the Humanities, University Library, Great Lakes Literary Arts Center, & Ann Arbor Book Festival.

Author’s Forum Presents: Darktown Follies: A Poetry Reading by Amaud Jamaul Johnson

Darktown Follies, Amaud Jamaul Johnson’s daring and surprising new collection of poems, responds to Black Vaudeville, specifically the personal and professional challenges African American variety performers faced in the early twentieth century. Johnson is fascinated by jokes that aren’t funny — particularly, what it means when humor fails or reveals something unintended about our national character. Darktown Follies is an act of self-sabotage, a poet’s willful attempt at recklessness, abandoning the “good sense” God gave him, as an effort to explore the boundaries and intersections of race and humor.

Born and raised in Compton, California, Amaud Jamaul Johnson was educated at Howard University and Cornell University. His first book, Red Summer (Tupelo, 2006), was winner of the Dorset Prize. A former Wallace Stegner Fellow in Poetry at Stanford University, his honors include fellowships from the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, the Hurston/Wright Foundation, and Cave Canem. He teaches in the MFA Program in Creative Writing at the University of Wisconsin—Madison.

The Author’s Forum is a collaboration between the U-M Institute for the Humanities, University Library, Great Lakes Literary Arts Center, & Ann Arbor Book Festival.